Kathy Ager
Lemon Bowl

Print —

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

$175 CAD

Archival print with silkscreen gloss by Kathy Ager.

  • Paper size: 20" x 20"
  • Edition of 50
  • Signed and numbered by the artist 
  • Comes with a certificate of authenticity
  • Sold unframed
  • Archival print with silkscreen gloss

    We ship worldwide with Fedex, DHL Express, Purolator as well as several door-to-door art handling companies (limited to certain cities). Shipping charges vary depending on product size and weight. Many original and glass framed works must be shipped in wood crates, the gallery will contact you upon purchase to send you a shipping invoice. All other works such as prints and small originals are carefully packaged in tubes and boxes. All orders are shipped 48 hours after purchase, Monday to Friday during opening hours. Unframed prints ship for free in North America. Some exceptions apply. Custom and duty fees are applied to shipments at the discretion of each receiving country. These charges are beyond our control and are the responsibility of the consignee. All sales are final. Please inspect your pieces for any possible damage and contact us within 48h of reception date if you find a problem. Contact us if you have specific shipping questions.

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    About Kathy Ager

    View All Work


    Biography

    It’s what flows beneath the surface that interests her. In Ager’s current body of work, she braves the mind’s basement, ventures into the heart’s deep dark woods, plundering pieces of people and things she encounters.

    The images that emerge are physical records from these intimate depths. Both deeply personal and universal, they are cryptic messages directed towards the audience. She challenges the viewer to face the discomfort and to see the beauty and power in letting yourself feel. She describes subjects such as dead animals, which frequently appear in her paintings, as the intimate and tender offerings of our nature which are subjected to the subtle brutality of consumable, disposable modern life and love.
    Sometimes strikingly eery or underlyingly violent, her works are crafted in a way that is original and appealing to the eye, and in a way become her weapons against the pain of letting oneself be vulnerable.